An Introduction to General Systems Thinking

An Introduction to General Systems Thinking For Than Twenty Five Years, An Introduction To General Systems Thinking Has Been Hailed As An Innovative Introduction To Systems Theory, With Applications In Computer Science And Beyond Used In University Courses And Professional Seminars All Over The World, The Text Has Proven Its Ability To Open Minds And Sharpen Thinking.Originally Published In 1975 And Reprinted Than Twenty Times Over A Quarter Century And Now Available For The First Time From Dorset House Publishing The Text Uses Clear Writing And Basic Algebraic Principles To Explore New Approaches To Projects, Products, Organizations, And Virtually Any Kind Of System.Scientists, Engineers, Organization Leaders, Managers, Doctors, Students, And Thinkers Of All Disciplines Can Use This Book To Dispel The Mental Fog That Clouds Problem Solving As Author Gerald M Weinberg Writes In The New Preface To The Silver Anniversary Edition, I Haven T Changed My Conviction That Most People Don T Think Nearly As Well As They Could Had They Been Taught Some Principles Of Thinking Now An Award Winning Author Of Nearly Forty Books Spanning The Entire Software Development Life Cycle, Weinberg Had Already Acquired Extensive Experience As A Programmer, Manager, University Professor, And Consultant When This Book Was Originally Published.With Helpful Illustrations, Numerous End Of Chapter Exercises, And An Appendix On A Mathematical Notation Used In Problem Solving, An Introduction To General Systems Thinking May Be Your Most Powerful Tool In Working With Problems, Systems, And Solutions.

Gerald Marvin Weinberg October 27, 1933 August 7, 2018 was an American computer scientist, author and teacher of the psychology and anthropology of computer software development.

❰Reading❯ ➸ An Introduction to General Systems Thinking Author Gerald M. Weinberg – Webcambestmilf.info
  • Paperback
  • 279 pages
  • An Introduction to General Systems Thinking
  • Gerald M. Weinberg
  • English
  • 24 June 2019
  • 0932633498

10 thoughts on “An Introduction to General Systems Thinking

  1. says:

    The book is excellent and deep The author is a guru in System Thinking and you feel it almost from the first page Huge number of examples and suggestions for discussions is the most valuable part of the book Spending most of my time in IT I had a limited view on the application of System Thinking This book opened my eyes to many interesting directions and spheres I wasn t aware of.At the same time the book is difficult to read Sometimes I found myself moving slowly through sentences trying The book is excellent and deep The author is a guru in System Thinking and you feel it almost from the first page Huge number of examples and suggestions for discussions is the most valuable part of the book Spending most of my time in IT I had a limited view on the application of System Thinking This book opened my eyes to many interesting directions and spheres I wasn t aware of.At the same time the book is difficult to read Sometimes I found myself moving slowly through sentences trying not to lose a narrative thread The author tried to improve a reader s experience by adding multiple Laws The idea is good but it didn t drastically change the situation

  2. says:

    This is one of those few books that I revisit every few years and always learn something new from If you re a systems designer of any sort I m a computer software architect developer then you ll find it remarkable how Gerry articulates things you ve sort of noticed but never personally fully quantified resulting in those wonderful ah ha moments Then he proceeds to map those back to first principles and relate it to all kinds of other relevant considerations you had never considered Pearls This is one of those few books that I revisit every few years and always learn something new from If you re a systems designer of any sort I m a computer software architect developer then you ll find it remarkable how Gerry articulates things you ve sort of noticed but never personally fully quantified resulting in those wonderful ah ha moments Then he proceeds to map those back to first principles and relate it to all kinds of other relevant considerations you had never considered Pearls of wisdom throughout but it s not light reading Will change your mind s shape so don t worry if all of it doesn t make sense the first time Give it a few runs through every year or so

  3. says:

    A lot of systems thinking writing is just piles of self justification management trash most of it doesn t worth the time spent reading This one though is a completely different beast.I feel like, what Baudrillard did for reality deconstruction, Weinberg does for knowledge and thinking processes His work on relationships between identity, change and regulation is just unparalleled So, if you enjoyed the first you will enjoy this too.also, prepare for a very condensed stream on knowledge in yo A lot of systems thinking writing is just piles of self justification management trash most of it doesn t worth the time spent reading This one though is a completely different beast.I feel like, what Baudrillard did for reality deconstruction, Weinberg does for knowledge and thinking processes His work on relationships between identity, change and regulation is just unparalleled So, if you enjoyed the first you will enjoy this too.also, prepare for a very condensed stream on knowledge in your face

  4. says:

    To be a successful generalist, then, we must approach complex systems with a certain naive simplicity We must be as little children, for we have much evidence that children learn most of theircomplex ideas in just this manner, first forming a general impression of the whole and only then passing down toparticular discriminations.Weinberg tries to explain how our preconceptions and biases get in the way of understanding the world around us.I aminterested in system thinking to a To be a successful generalist, then, we must approach complex systems with a certain naive simplicity We must be as little children, for we have much evidence that children learn most of theircomplex ideas in just this manner, first forming a general impression of the whole and only then passing down toparticular discriminations.Weinberg tries to explain how our preconceptions and biases get in the way of understanding the world around us.I aminterested in system thinking to apply to creating complex creations

  5. says:

    Interesting, but not so well written edited Hard to see how these ideas can be put into practice.

  6. says:

    I can t tell if I didn t like the style or the content Weinberg and I are both computer guys and so felt I was understanding.And that feeling was that the book doesn t do a very good job explaining a method of thinking.On the other hand, anyone who approvingly quotes Bakunin is someone to take seriously

  7. says:

    Although it has beenthan three years March 9, 2015 since I first purchased Weinberg s book, An Introduction to General Systems Thinking , in many ways it represents the perfect compliment to the works, Wholeness and the Implicate Order and An Introduction to Special Relativity both written by David Bohm.Where Bohm leaves off, pleading for acarefully structured approach towards understanding the process of thought, Weinberg gladly picks up both the trail and the mantle It is Although it has beenthan three years March 9, 2015 since I first purchased Weinberg s book, An Introduction to General Systems Thinking , in many ways it represents the perfect compliment to the works, Wholeness and the Implicate Order and An Introduction to Special Relativity both written by David Bohm.Where Bohm leaves off, pleading for acarefully structured approach towards understanding the process of thought, Weinberg gladly picks up both the trail and the mantle It is important to note that this is a book about General Systems Thinking , and not just another book on general systems theory.Throughout his work Weinberg carefully delves into the nature of thought, placing particular emphasis on many of the assumptions laid down by modern science that remain unspoken and behind the scenes He is one of the few authors that I have come across that manages to stay away from the a system is a collection of interconnected parts definition, choosing to define it instead as a way of looking at the world.This definition provided me with yet another perspective on the relative nature of physical reality, and the importance of incorporating the perspective of the observer in our investigation of ourselves, others, and the world around us Five out of five stars for the clarity and thoughtfulness that the author aspires to, along with the realization that I will continue to reference this book for many, many years to come

  8. says:

    There are a lot of good ideas here, but for a book that is supposed to help people think it is incredibly badly organized, and he uses terms he does not define and laws he never states explicitly I read it as an ebook from Smashwords, which enabled me to look up terms or laws that I thought I could not remember, so I can be confident of that I am really surpirsed it is considered a classic.It is clearly intended to be a textbook There are some quite interesting problems at the end of each There are a lot of good ideas here, but for a book that is supposed to help people think it is incredibly badly organized, and he uses terms he does not define and laws he never states explicitly I read it as an ebook from Smashwords, which enabled me to look up terms or laws that I thought I could not remember, so I can be confident of that I am really surpirsed it is considered a classic.It is clearly intended to be a textbook There are some quite interesting problems at the end of each chapter giving a situation in some field and asking the reader to apply the principles of that chapter to the situation Many of these could be term paper topics involving reading other articles or books This would be a very hard book to rate I liked the approach but hated the reading of the book My recommendation would be to find a different book on the same topic if possible

  9. says:

    I m always wary when I encounter a clich , or an orphaned maxim Often there are useful pieces of knowledge underlying the creation of these bundlings, but they re not necessarily conducive to deriving it Rather, the underlying utility is only recoverable through the process of independent, if potentially guided, discovery This is after all why a good maths teacher will attempt to give youcontext for a theory than just its corresponding formulae.This book suffers from the sense of clich I m always wary when I encounter a clich , or an orphaned maxim Often there are useful pieces of knowledge underlying the creation of these bundlings, but they re not necessarily conducive to deriving it Rather, the underlying utility is only recoverable through the process of independent, if potentially guided, discovery This is after all why a good maths teacher will attempt to give youcontext for a theory than just its corresponding formulae.This book suffers from the sense of clich , not in its contained laws whose context is well described , but in its general form I understand that Systems Thinking is the art of being a generalist, breaking down problems, and applying cross domain metaphors but I don t understand the conclusive picture these traits should click into As a result, I currently consider Systems Thinking as I consider Constructivist political thought largely a descriptive framework with narratives conducive to post hoc extension, and largely not an applicable or predictive framework.Most likely I d reach the afundamental understanding from rereading the book, or approaching it in the seminar setting described in the preface It s also possible that I have too much computer science background to appreciate the book it is after all an attempt togenerally apply a set of scientific, and often computer science oriented, principles

  10. says:

    As the book points out in the beginning a person with a CS background might not get much out of it and I fully agree with this statement My reason for the low rating is that I was expectingin terms of way to think about things differently, meaning to see or extract general pictures The book isabout possible ways to consider things One of the most useful passage for me was the following In the kingdom of the blind, the one eyed man is king Well, it never turns out quite that way As the book points out in the beginning a person with a CS background might not get much out of it and I fully agree with this statement My reason for the low rating is that I was expectingin terms of way to think about things differently, meaning to see or extract general pictures The book isabout possible ways to consider things One of the most useful passage for me was the following In the kingdom of the blind, the one eyed man is king Well, it never turns out quite that way, as H.G Wells knew he wrote his story The Country of the Blind A one eyed man who happens upon a blind society does not become its king, for he cannot even function and is thought to be insane or sick Because of the importance of category systems in a social group, it is not the outsider with a better system that becomes king, but the insider who most thoroughly masters the internal system Should one of these leaders be removed to another group, his native talent evaporates, and probably becomes a severe handicap

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *