Antarctica: Exploring the Extreme: 400 Years of Adventure

Antarctica: Exploring the Extreme: 400 Years of Adventure Really interesting historical account of the numerous folks who "discovered" the polar continent and what motivated them to do so. Definitely made me excited about the upcoming trip! (Well, except for all the accounts of scurvy, dysentery and falling through crevasses.) Antarctica Exploring The Th ContinentVR Stand Amidst A Gentoo Penguin Colony And Take In All The Sights And Sounds Explore The Stunning Landscapes InVirtual Reality On A Quark Antarctic ExpeAntarctica Exploring The ExtremeYearsNotRetrouvez Antarctica Exploring The ExtremeYears Of Adventure Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D Occasion WEM Antarctica Exploring The National Geographic WEM Antarctica Exploring The National Geographic Explorer Ship Th FebruaryWEM Marketing Dept Uncategorised No Comments A Visit To Antarctica Is Like No Other, Equally Challenging As It Is Rewarding, The Awe Inspiring Landscapes And Superb Wildlife Viewing Opportunities Make Antarctica Exploring The Other Pole YouTube El Visionario Lvaro Sanz Viaj A La Antrtida Junto A OLYMPUS Y Silver Sea Cruises Document Todo Su Viaje En El Viaje En El Blog Antarctica Exploring The Frozen Continent Antarctica Exploring The Frozen ContinentDay Voyage From , Per Person MS Fridtjof Nansen This Exhilarating Expedition Voyage Ventures Far Into The Stunning Wilderness Of The South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula And, If Conditions Allow, As Far South As The Antarctic Circle DayBuenos Aires Your Expedition Begins With An Overnight Stay In The Energetic City Of BuenosAntarctica White Continent Adventure Travel Exploring Antarctica DayExploring Antarctica DayExploring Antarctica Day At Sea Day Disembark Ushuaia Fly To Buenos Aires Explorer, Endurance Or Santiago Orion Home See Day By Day Details Make A Reservation Printable Itinerary Summary PDF Make A Reservation Journey To Antarctica The White ContinentDownload PDF Antarctica Exploring The Extreme Download Antarctica Exploring The Extreme Ebook PDF Or Read Online Books In PDF, EPUB, And Mobi Format Click Download Or Read Online Button To Antarctica Exploring The Extreme Book Pdf For Free Now Antarctica Exploring The Extreme Author Marilyn Landis ISBNGenre History File SizeMB Format PDF, Mobi DownloadReadDownload EBook The Danger AndAntarctica Exploring The ExtremeYears Of Antarctica Represents For Many The Final Frontier On A Greatly Explored Earth Yet For Such An Unknown Land Terra Incognita It Has Exerted A Strong Pull On The Imagination Of Adventurers And Explorers For Hundreds Of Years Some Of The Stories Are Not Well Known, Others Are Exhaustively Chronicles, Such As Explorations By Byrd And Shackelford A Timeline Of Antarctic Exploration What Is Called The Heroic Age Of Antarctic Exploration Ended Inwith The Death Of Ernest Shackleton The Main Routes To Antarctica Had Been Found And The South Pole Had Been Reached Aircraft Became Used Increasingly Along With Steel Hulled Ice Strengthened Ships Withpowerful Engines Capable Of Pushing Through Sea Ice With Less Danger Of Being Trapped Radio Was Developed And Became Landis focuses on the discovery of Antarctica, in terms of first contact with humans, interior explorations, and its wildlife. The organization is a bit disjoint and there are some repetitions in later chapters on specific areas of the continent. The book is very interesting but insufficiently comprehensive particular in terms of latter day developments. OST NONFICTION ADULT STACKS: 919.8 LAN NonFiction. Ah, a book with two subtitles, rarely a good sign. I wanted a history of Antarctic exploration, and this was the closest thing I could find. It does exploration, sort of, but it also covers the whaling and sealing industry of the 1900s—which basically made me want to vomit—Antarctic land use and treaties, everybody who ever sailed past the subantarctic islands, and penguins and other wildlife. Now, the descriptions of each penguin species were easily my favorite part of the book—some steal pebbles from their neighbors! and then, if caught, pretend to be asleep!—but, uh, that's not what I was reading this for.

The book covers the same ground repeatedly, as if each chapter were meant to stand alone, and its episodic nature and disjointed chronology make it difficult to get an accurate picture of Antarctic history. Not even the time line was in chronological order! And it omits important points like "first to reach the South Magnetic Pole" and "first to reach the South Pole"! Why even bother putting in a time line???

It's also wrong, at least twice. In Landis' account of North Pole history, I found two misstatements—one minor, but one so bizarre I had no idea where she even got it. It makes me wonder what else was wrong about this book.

It's got black and white photographs, many taken by the author, a glossary and an index, but absolutely no source notes, just a selected bibliography. And it only has one crummy map (two if you count the endpapers; I don't). I cannot stress enough how fucking ridiculous it is to spend so much time talking about the geography of Antarctica and not give the reader any kind of reference point.

Two stars. All that, and it's a slog to read, too. I suppose individual chapters might have some use if you needed a very basic (and possibly inaccurate) introduction to Antarctica, but on the whole this book is poorly organized and its scholarship is questionable. There is plenty of information about the history of Antarctic exploration in Marilyn J. Landis's book, recounted in a reasonably entertaining way, and so the book is marginally recommendablebut it's got a lot of problems that keep me from rating it above three stars. First, it's clear that Landis has done no new archival research, so the actual necessity of the book is in question; there are plenty of other books that cover this subjectmatter. Second, the material is very badly arranged. Landis's Chapters 8 through 12, comprising "Regional Explorations," should have been folded into her Chapters 1 through 7, "General Exploration," and the whole should have been put in strict chronological orderas it is, she keeps circling back to the same stories that she has told already! It's not apparent what Chapters 13 and 14, "Exploring Antarctica's Geography and Wildlife," are doing here at all; they seem to belong to a different book altogether. Finally, the use of photographs is inadequate, and the maps are outright bad. A book like this needs an excellent effort in both those departments. The endpaper map is very poorly cropped, and the halfpage map on page xthe only map in the body of the book!is difficult to use and lacking in essential information.

You hear all the time that the standards of book production are not what they used to be, and often, it is too true.

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Antarctica: Exploring the Extreme: 400 Years of Adventure book, this is one of the most wanted Marilyn J. Landis author readers around the world.

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    The book covers the same ground repeatedly, as if each chapter were meant to stand alone, and its episodic nature and disjointed chronology make it difficult to get an accurate picture of Antarctic history. Not even the time line was in chronological order! And it omits important points like "first to reach the South Magnetic Pole" and "first to reach the South Pole"! Why even bother putting in a time line???

    It's also wrong, at least twice. In Landis' account of North Pole history, I found two misstatements—one minor, but one so bizarre I had no idea where she even got it. It makes me wonder what else was wrong about this book.

    It's got black and white photographs, many taken by the author, a glossary and an index, but absolutely no source notes, just a selected bibliography. And it only has one crummy map (two if you count the endpapers; I don't). I cannot stress enough how fucking ridiculous it is to spend so much time talking about the geography of Antarctica and not give the reader any kind of reference point.

    Two stars. All that, and it's a slog to read, too. I suppose individual chapters might have some use if you needed a very basic (and possibly inaccurate) introduction to Antarctica, but on the whole this book is poorly organized and its scholarship is questionable. There is plenty of information about the history of Antarctic exploration in Marilyn J. Landis's book, recounted in a reasonably entertaining way, and so the book is marginally recommendablebut it's got a lot of problems that keep me from rating it above three stars. First, it's clear that Landis has done no new archival research, so the actual necessity of the book is in question; there are plenty of other books that cover this subjectmatter. Second, the material is very badly arranged. Landis's Chapters 8 through 12, comprising "Regional Explorations," should have been folded into her Chapters 1 through 7, "General Exploration," and the whole should have been put in strict chronological orderas it is, she keeps circling back to the same stories that she has told already! It's not apparent what Chapters 13 and 14, "Exploring Antarctica's Geography and Wildlife," are doing here at all; they seem to belong to a different book altogether. Finally, the use of photographs is inadequate, and the maps are outright bad. A book like this needs an excellent effort in both those departments. The endpaper map is very poorly cropped, and the halfpage map on page xthe only map in the body of the book!is difficult to use and lacking in essential information.

    You hear all the time that the standards of book production are not what they used to be, and often, it is too true. "/>
  • Paperback
  • 416 pages
  • Antarctica: Exploring the Extreme: 400 Years of Adventure
  • Marilyn J. Landis
  • English
  • 08 August 2019
  • 9781556524806

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