Paying the Price

Paying the Price Reading this book reminded me of watching a seasoned heavy weight fighter, one who grabs you and holds you through 11 rounds and then suddenlybam!starts swinging. Hard. Here, the author also takes time to build her argument, to carefully present her argument and then ends with fire. If you have the time, by all means, read the entire thing. But if you want to cut to the chase, skip right to the last chapter (90 footnotes!) and you will find gems like these: "[The financial aid system] allows liberals to feel good and the poor indebted, while at the same time providing a scapegoat for conservatives to blame" (236). And yet Betsy DeVos is our Secretary of Education . . . This is a phenomenal, indepth look at the way that financial aid functions in the state of Wisconsin and in the United States generally. It is not, as some have suggested, propaganda for free college but a datadriven look at the effectiveness of financial aid systems. GoldrickRab does suggest that ultimately, in order to remain competitive globally, a tuitionfree system is going to be necessary but the vast majority of the book focuses on the inefficiencies of the financial aid system, the failures in the algorithms used to calculate financial aid, the outdated approach to funding mechanisms, and the ways in which the current system often hinders rather than helping students toward degree completion and the serious financial costs of such failures. This books is based on an intensive, longitudinal study of a variety of Pell grant students and presents a very damning critique of the ineffectiveness of federal and state funding mechanisms and their inability to meet the needs of today's college students. It's vital reading to anyone who wants a clearer picture of the way that financial aid works in this country and some of the fixes that we could attempt (both major and minor) to improve the situation for the vast majority of college students and parents. It's also incredibly accessibly written and uses an excellent mix of analytical data and individual anecdotes to convey its message. A few striking quotes:

"failure to complete does not reflect intellectual ability but, rather, an inability to pay" (239)
"too many students are dropping out of college because they cannot cover their rent, utilities, childcare, gas, or other critical basic needs" 246
"debt is the symptom, not the diseasethe real problem is that college is unaffordable" (241)
"the main barrier to college entry [and completion] is price" (256)

She does not recommend expanding financial aid as we know it, but reconceptualizing higher education as a public good

Suggests extending free and reduced lunch to collegeswe recognize that students can't learn if they're hungry before they're 18, why do we think they can after that age?
Really useful survey data and stats on student loans and how they affect students. My impression after reading the book is that the system is a mess, that students do not have the right information, debt is psychologically and emotionally destructive, and yet it's really important that student loans be available and easy to get because most of these students will not be able to attend college otherwise. And yes, not everyone needs to attend a fancy school, but that's not what they are talking about here. They are talking about normal state or community schools and standard programs. If you are at all interested in the process of financial aid in higher education, this is a useful book. I work with a lot of college students who depend on financial aid to make higher education and its resulting benefits possible. GoldrickRab does a good job explaining why our current system isn't working for many students, why this is so, and she presents some alternative options. I do think it could benefit from additional research into the realities of developmental first year students and the financial realities faced by rural students, but that reflects more of my own day to day reality. I appreciate the author's detailed attention to important financial issues faced by our current students. Even though I work in higher education I learned a lot from this book. Some of it was frustrating e.g. that Ivy League schools with billion dollar endowments receive more work study funds than community colleges where there are more students in need. Some of it was enlightening e.g how expected family contribution is computed and assumes that parents (including parents who are divorced) will be willing to contribute to their child's education. Some of it hit close to home. The students profiled in her book match many I see on a day to day basis. They are working often to help support their families yet still food insecure and sometimes homeless. These students value education and push through these obstacles to get to class, to learn, and try to make a better life. As Sara GoldrickRab argues, they deserve better from our financial aid system. Must read for anyone who cares about the future of higher education in the United States. GoldrickRab deftly weaves together statistics, policy analysis, history, and personal stories in this book about how much college really costs in the U.S., why, and how it affects students. I often had to set it aside because it lays bare the many ways Americans are failing the next generation and ensuring that wealth inequality will only increase.

I'm so disappointed with and furious at state legislatures. Also, I understand the labyrinth of financial aid a lot better now. If you received financial aid to attend college but it was more than 5 or so years ago, you probably don't know how much it has changed.

I wish I could make my state representatives read this book. Institutions of higher education are working hard to meet student needs, but the problem is systemic and won't be able to be fixed at the institutional level.

Americans: we have valued education so much in the past and understood it as more than an individual good. What happened? Can we really not see beyond ourselves and our own interests? I read this because although I'm teaching at an American institution right now, I was an undergrad in a different country (one with free tuition), and felt I needed to know more about how financial aid works in the US in order to better understand my students' situation. It turns out that pretty much every teacher in higher ed, regardless of background, needs to read this book. Goldrick Rab presents a damning indictment of the convoluted current system of FAFSA, Pell Grants, workstudy placements and so on, which often serve to cushion those from wealthy backgrounds and to punish those from poor backgrounds for trying to succeed. (I gasped at the cruelty of the system in Milwaukee, where a young woman who had lived her whole life with her mother in subsidised housing was told that she would be evicted for being a fulltime student; parttime, fine, unemployed, okay, but fulltime and therefore graduating on time with less debt? No.) Rather than blaming Entitled Millennials, Goldrick Rab points the finger squarely at a rigged system.

Far too many American students are homeless, far too many are going to class hungry, far too many are failing classes because they're so exhausted from working long hours trying to pay for those classes in the first place. For all the claims of American exceptionalism, the USA lags far behind many other countries in college graduation rates (and indeed in social mobility). There's no one solution to all of these problems, but Goldrick Rab rightly urges that colleges and the federal and state government at least start to recognise that they exist. Paying The Price Traduction En Franais ExemplesTraductions En Contexte De Paying The Price En Anglais Franais Avec Reverso Context Paying The Top PricePaying The Price Davis, C Dailey, CarlaNotRetrouvez Paying The Price Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D OccasionPaying The Price Millward, Stephanie Livres NotRetrouvez Paying The Price Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D Occasion Paying The Price Ebook EPub Angelica Siren AchatPaying The Price, Angelica Siren, Auto Dition Des Milliers De Livres Avec La Livraison Chez Vous Enjour Ou En Magasin Avec % De Rduction Pay The Price Idioms By The Free Dictionary Lit To Pay The Price That Is Asked For Goods Or Services Usually Implying That The Price Is High If This Is The Quality Of Goods That You Require, You Will Have To Pay The PricePaying The Price College Costs, Financial Aid, And Paying The Price Is An Urgent And Necessary Text Through Rigorous Research And Careful Analysis, Sara Goldrick Rab Shows How The American Dream Is Structurally Compromised By The Exorbitant Costs Of Higher Education And A Thoroughly Dysfunctional Financial Aid System With Texture And Subtlety, Goldrick Rab Spotlights The Journeys Of Students Whose Road To Educational Access And Are Paying The Price Traduction En Franais ExemplesTraductions En Contexte De Are Paying The Price En Anglais Franais Avec Reverso Context Our Economies Are Paying The Price For Inaction Paying The Price Of Sanity Mental Illness In A Paying The Price Of Sanity Mental Illness In A Humane Light Mental Illness Is The Price We Pay For Civilization Posted Nov ,Paying The Price College Costs, Financial Aid, And Paying The Price Is An Invaluable Resource, Chock Full Of Data And Empathy, To Bring To That Effort Diane Ravitch Goldrick Rab S Important Book Should Be Read By Policymakers, Students, And Parents She Explains Clearly How Access To College Has Been Narrowed By Rising Costs, How Elected Officials Have Dodged Their Responsibility To Maintain Access, And What We Must Do To Save The American

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Paying the Price book, this is one of the most wanted Sara Goldrick-Rab author readers around the world.

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    "failure to complete does not reflect intellectual ability but, rather, an inability to pay" (239)
    "too many students are dropping out of college because they cannot cover their rent, utilities, childcare, gas, or other critical basic needs" 246
    "debt is the symptom, not the diseasethe real problem is that college is unaffordable" (241)
    "the main barrier to college entry [and completion] is price" (256)

    She does not recommend expanding financial aid as we know it, but reconceptualizing higher education as a public good

    Suggests extending free and reduced lunch to collegeswe recognize that students can't learn if they're hungry before they're 18, why do we think they can after that age?
    Really useful survey data and stats on student loans and how they affect students. My impression after reading the book is that the system is a mess, that students do not have the right information, debt is psychologically and emotionally destructive, and yet it's really important that student loans be available and easy to get because most of these students will not be able to attend college otherwise. And yes, not everyone needs to attend a fancy school, but that's not what they are talking about here. They are talking about normal state or community schools and standard programs. If you are at all interested in the process of financial aid in higher education, this is a useful book. I work with a lot of college students who depend on financial aid to make higher education and its resulting benefits possible. GoldrickRab does a good job explaining why our current system isn't working for many students, why this is so, and she presents some alternative options. I do think it could benefit from additional research into the realities of developmental first year students and the financial realities faced by rural students, but that reflects more of my own day to day reality. I appreciate the author's detailed attention to important financial issues faced by our current students. Even though I work in higher education I learned a lot from this book. Some of it was frustrating e.g. that Ivy League schools with billion dollar endowments receive more work study funds than community colleges where there are more students in need. Some of it was enlightening e.g how expected family contribution is computed and assumes that parents (including parents who are divorced) will be willing to contribute to their child's education. Some of it hit close to home. The students profiled in her book match many I see on a day to day basis. They are working often to help support their families yet still food insecure and sometimes homeless. These students value education and push through these obstacles to get to class, to learn, and try to make a better life. As Sara GoldrickRab argues, they deserve better from our financial aid system. Must read for anyone who cares about the future of higher education in the United States. GoldrickRab deftly weaves together statistics, policy analysis, history, and personal stories in this book about how much college really costs in the U.S., why, and how it affects students. I often had to set it aside because it lays bare the many ways Americans are failing the next generation and ensuring that wealth inequality will only increase.

    I'm so disappointed with and furious at state legislatures. Also, I understand the labyrinth of financial aid a lot better now. If you received financial aid to attend college but it was more than 5 or so years ago, you probably don't know how much it has changed.

    I wish I could make my state representatives read this book. Institutions of higher education are working hard to meet student needs, but the problem is systemic and won't be able to be fixed at the institutional level.

    Americans: we have valued education so much in the past and understood it as more than an individual good. What happened? Can we really not see beyond ourselves and our own interests? I read this because although I'm teaching at an American institution right now, I was an undergrad in a different country (one with free tuition), and felt I needed to know more about how financial aid works in the US in order to better understand my students' situation. It turns out that pretty much every teacher in higher ed, regardless of background, needs to read this book. Goldrick Rab presents a damning indictment of the convoluted current system of FAFSA, Pell Grants, workstudy placements and so on, which often serve to cushion those from wealthy backgrounds and to punish those from poor backgrounds for trying to succeed. (I gasped at the cruelty of the system in Milwaukee, where a young woman who had lived her whole life with her mother in subsidised housing was told that she would be evicted for being a fulltime student; parttime, fine, unemployed, okay, but fulltime and therefore graduating on time with less debt? No.) Rather than blaming Entitled Millennials, Goldrick Rab points the finger squarely at a rigged system.

    Far too many American students are homeless, far too many are going to class hungry, far too many are failing classes because they're so exhausted from working long hours trying to pay for those classes in the first place. For all the claims of American exceptionalism, the USA lags far behind many other countries in college graduation rates (and indeed in social mobility). There's no one solution to all of these problems, but Goldrick Rab rightly urges that colleges and the federal and state government at least start to recognise that they exist. Paying The Price Traduction En Franais ExemplesTraductions En Contexte De Paying The Price En Anglais Franais Avec Reverso Context Paying The Top PricePaying The Price Davis, C Dailey, CarlaNotRetrouvez Paying The Price Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D OccasionPaying The Price Millward, Stephanie Livres NotRetrouvez Paying The Price Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D Occasion Paying The Price Ebook EPub Angelica Siren AchatPaying The Price, Angelica Siren, Auto Dition Des Milliers De Livres Avec La Livraison Chez Vous Enjour Ou En Magasin Avec % De Rduction Pay The Price Idioms By The Free Dictionary Lit To Pay The Price That Is Asked For Goods Or Services Usually Implying That The Price Is High If This Is The Quality Of Goods That You Require, You Will Have To Pay The PricePaying The Price College Costs, Financial Aid, And Paying The Price Is An Urgent And Necessary Text Through Rigorous Research And Careful Analysis, Sara Goldrick Rab Shows How The American Dream Is Structurally Compromised By The Exorbitant Costs Of Higher Education And A Thoroughly Dysfunctional Financial Aid System With Texture And Subtlety, Goldrick Rab Spotlights The Journeys Of Students Whose Road To Educational Access And Are Paying The Price Traduction En Franais ExemplesTraductions En Contexte De Are Paying The Price En Anglais Franais Avec Reverso Context Our Economies Are Paying The Price For Inaction Paying The Price Of Sanity Mental Illness In A Paying The Price Of Sanity Mental Illness In A Humane Light Mental Illness Is The Price We Pay For Civilization Posted Nov ,Paying The Price College Costs, Financial Aid, And Paying The Price Is An Invaluable Resource, Chock Full Of Data And Empathy, To Bring To That Effort Diane Ravitch Goldrick Rab S Important Book Should Be Read By Policymakers, Students, And Parents She Explains Clearly How Access To College Has Been Narrowed By Rising Costs, How Elected Officials Have Dodged Their Responsibility To Maintain Access, And What We Must Do To Save The American"/>
  • Paying the Price
  • Sara Goldrick-Rab
  • 03 November 2019

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